Ryan Dziadul

Ryan Dziadul

by Melissa Magsaysay

As a longtime fashion publicist, Ryan Dziadul has seen trends come and go and the industry shift in dramatic ways. What has been a constant is the lack of diversity in male representation and the dearth of stylish (or even classic) clothing options for larger frames.

While working as the PR director for Jonathan Adler (a position he has held for over 3 years), it dawned on Dziadul to start documenting his personal style (pure prep punctuated with luxury accessories) on a fashion blog. With Extra Extra Style, he is able to share his daily looks, witty musings and love of fashion. He is able to participate in the fashion world on his own terms - something he says that larger people (men and women) cannot always do when it comes to the traditionally narrow standards of the industry.

Though he mines classic brands like Brooks Brothers, Ralph Lauren and Levis and has a clear understanding of what he likes and what fits well, there are still plenty of high end fashion brands who still do not make pieces that deviate from a sinewy model frame.

Dziadul has shown that men’s style should know no size. When he teamed up with friend Katie Sturino (of the 12ish Style) to recreate a look worn by Meghan Markle and Prince Harry, the image went viral and his blog has caught more attention from the general public.

“I started getting messages like, "Thank you so much, my son is big and like he always felt bad and now I'm so happy I showed him your posts.”, Says Dziadul, “Or, "My husband is a big guy. And he would never go shopping for himself. But I showed him your pictures and he likes what you're doing". Stuff like that, means so much.”

Here, the publicist and style blogger shares the impetus to start Extra Extra Style and breaks down the misconception that bigger men don’t want amazing clothes.

“I've never been able to open a magazine and see someone who looked like me. The closest they get to someone who likes me is an athletic football player, which is not my body shape and it's not how I identify. And I think everybody sort of feels like that. You want to feel like you're normal and when you look in the mirror and you see yourself it’s not weird. That there's other people like you. And so I wanted to create the kind of thing that I wished that I had when I was like a 16 year old guy trying to navigate life.”
Plus Size Designer Fashion Ryan Dziadul of The Extra Extra Style
Ryan Dziadul of The Extra Extra Style
Plus Size Designer Fashion Ryan Dziadul of The Extra Extra Style and Katie Sturino of The 12ish Style
Dziadul and Katie Sturino of The 12ish Style as Prince Harry and Meghan Markle

Q & A With Ryan

Why Extra Extra Style? Why did you decide to start the blog?

It was actually my friend Katie of The 12ish Style who used to work in fashion PR. We were hanging out, this was three summers ago now and talking about what it was like to be like the biggest person in the room at fashion events. And how difficult it was to be someone interested in fashion but not able to participate in a full way. We could all get the Chanel bag and the Gucci shoes but to actually purchase and participate fully, it's not something we're able to do.

She had started her blog at this point. And I was like, "women are so lucky that they have a resource like you guys. I don't have that". And she was like, "Well you should be that resource". And I said, "Oh, you're right. I should". So that's where it started. And it was like, I kind of started, not selfishly, but in my mind I was like, I like shopping, I like clothes, there have to be other people, other big dudes, who like that too. And so it was about, in my mind, sharing resources and what I'm buying.

It's been really fun to see the messages from people and people actually buying stuff that I like, It's like validating my own style too. But it's also mainly trying things that I wouldn't have been trying on my own.

What do you think is the most common misconception about men who are larger and fashion?

That they're not interested. Because I think, in general, people think that men aren't that into fashion to begin with. And then we narrow it down further to like big guys and that they're not interested in fashion. But, everyone wants to look good. No matter what your style is. And that's another thing too. I'm not saying I'm the first person to do this. But I think that a lot of the other guys who are showing their style on Instagram are not preppy or have the classic point of view that I have. And so they're, you know, not showing things that I would necessarily wear and that I think are wearable in a professional setting at work you know.

You have to get dressed 365 days a year. So what do you wear? You're not wearing a suit everyday, you're not wearing basketball shorts, what happens in between? And that's what I hope to share and inspire and you know, it's been fun for me too.

As far as like body image and pressure, do you feel like men who work in fashion have it just as much as women?

“I've never been able to open a magazine and see someone who looked like me. The closest they get to someone who likes me is an athletic football player, which is not my body shape and it's not how I identify. And I think everybody sort of feels like that. You want to feel like you're normal and when you look in the mirror and you see yourself it’s not weird. That there's other people like you. And so I wanted to create the kind of thing that I wished that I had when I was like a 16 year old guy trying to navigate life.”

And obviously I’m not setting the world on fire with my fashion, but I think that I dress the way a lot of people dress. And so I want to like share that, maybe help people amp it up a little bit.

What is it like to try and find men’s designer or high end clothing in larger sizes?

I've worked in the industry or similar industries my entire career. And I'm like, don't you want to make money? I've gotten to the point where I have a moderately successful career, married to someone who's successful in his career, like I want to spend and there’s nowhere I can go on a Saturday afternoon with friends. I can't find my size in a store. I don't understand why retailers would leave that money on the table.

Do you ever get comments or mail from people about body shape?

Yeah, for sure. I mean probably it's more of it with women because women have hips, and butts, and boobs. But there's this one guy I talk to on DM and he was talking about Gucci stuff and is asked me, "Do you ever wear Gucci?" And I was like, "No. It doesn't fit me." They go up to 3XL. Him and I have the same jacket size and same pant size, but just because of how it's proportioned, it fits him, it doesn't fit me. So it's tough. I get it. I'm not saying it's easy to be a brand and to make this stuff, but the brand that does it right is gonna make a lot of money. I don't understand why people won't try, you know?

How did the Meghan Markle/Prince Harry image happen?

So my friend Katie does this thing called Supersize the Look and she asked me if I would be the Prince Harry to her Meghan Markle. And it got picked up everywhere. It was insane. And now when she posts one the, she just posted on yesterday, with Hunter McGrady, someone asked why Extra Extra Style wasn’t in it as the paparazzi, because it was Gigi and Bella with paparazzi in the back.

So you are in demand?

It's been really fun. And it's fun to see where it goes. In general I would say 95% of the feedback from it has been positive. And I think Instagram, because it's sort of like a self-selecting, you only follow who you want to follow, you see what you want to see, it's been very positive.

On some sites there were some negative comments like, “Duke and Duchess of York? More like Duke and Duchess of Pork.” it hurts for like half a second and then it doesn't because, like, what kind of loser is sitting commenting on stuff anyway, you know?

Obviously the impact you're making on younger people. Or just anyone who is seeing themselves more or feels validated through your images, that likely eclipses anything.

Yeah, I mean selfishly, I love that I'm helping other people. But the best thing that's come out of it is now I walk into a store and ask if they have my size. That sort of self acceptance has been amazing.

People come in all different shapes and sizes. And we need to normalize that, right? like, I will never be thin. I will never be 5 feet tall. It's just not what I am. So why am I fighting to become something that's not me, you know? I think people become very fixated on size in our society. And it's just like, I hope that I'm showing more than just that part of who I am. That I am more than just a fat guy. And so like, through my captions, or what I'm doing in the images, I hope that I'm showing that.

What are some brands, not just male brands, brands that you feel are doing a good job? That you know you can turn to or you can walk into the store and feel like they're inclusive.

I wish I had 11 Honore for me!

It's hard to like walk into a store. I wear a lot of Brooks Brothers. I can buy the tops in stores. I can't buy the pants. Same with Lacoste and Ralph Lauren. You know, I'm happy that the conversation has started and more and more people are carrying stuff online. And I feel like you gotta start somewhere.

Featured Products

Baja East

Horse T-Shirt

$195
$97.50
Fuzzi

Floral Cardigan

$395
$197.50
Baja East

Harem Pant

$695
$347.50
The Denim Divide

The Denim Divide

How to Wear a Jumpsuit

How to Wear a Jumpsuit

Share This: